Jumping off Bridges

"Jump, and you will find out how to unfold your wings as you fall."

secondlina:

Here is “Knot”, a short comic I drew to sell at Mocca and TCAF this year. The printed version is going to be SO PRETTY. I’m in love with the cover (which I will post later).

I just wanted to do something fairy-tale-like that talked about doubts and frustrations and how to deal with them. I’m really happy with how colorful and adorable the story turned out to be. 

If you enjoyed “Knot”, please consider reblogging it and/or checking out my ongoing webcomic Namesake! HUGS TO ALL OF YOU!

hace 2 semanas

omgthatdress:

drtuesdaygjohnson:

ayabug:

This is a photo of 2 1/2 year old Franklin D. Roosevelt. At the time of this photograph, 1884, it was the social norm to dress children in gender neutral clothing, white dresses, until about 6 or 7.
When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?
From the Ladies Home Journal in 1918:


The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.



I think it’s fascinating these so-called traditions of pink being for girls and gender being defined in a specific way are actually rather recent and quite malleable. People need to learn some history and get ready for change.

I’ve definitely reblogged this article before, but it’s always worth another.

the dresses worn by children weren’t necessarily gender neutral- while white was popular for infants, toddler boys wore dresses with darker, masculine colors and bolder decorations while girl’s dresses were lighter and frillier.

omgthatdress:

drtuesdaygjohnson:

ayabug:

This is a photo of 2 1/2 year old Franklin D. Roosevelt. At the time of this photograph, 1884, it was the social norm to dress children in gender neutral clothing, white dresses, until about 6 or 7.

When Did Girls Start Wearing Pink?

From the Ladies Home Journal in 1918:

The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls. The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy, while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl.

I think it’s fascinating these so-called traditions of pink being for girls and gender being defined in a specific way are actually rather recent and quite malleable. People need to learn some history and get ready for change.

I’ve definitely reblogged this article before, but it’s always worth another.

the dresses worn by children weren’t necessarily gender neutral- while white was popular for infants, toddler boys wore dresses with darker, masculine colors and bolder decorations while girl’s dresses were lighter and frillier.

hace 1 año

The Power of Introverts

hace 1 año

How To Be Alone (A video by filmaker, Andrea Dorfman, and poet/singer/songwriter, Tanya Davis.)

(Fuente: youtube.com)